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Council defeats one resolution, passes another

MFD to get new fire truck

January 15, 2013
By DAVID ALEXANDER - Staff Writer (dalexander@timesrepublican.com) , Times-Republican

The Marshalltown City Council voted on two resolutions at its weekly meeting Monday night, defeating one unanimously and approving the other unanimously.

One of the resolutions was to bond for an additional $600,000 to purchase the Marshalltown Fire Department a new fire engine. The truck, which is worth $800,000, would replace a 40 year-old one that is becoming obsolete.

Public hearing for that bond issuance is set for Jan. 28.

Article Photos

T-R PHOTO BY DAVID ALEXANDER
At its Monday night meeting, the council voted unanimously to bond an additional $600,000 to replace a fire truck, shown here, at the Marshalltown Fire Department. The truck is 40 years old.

Leon Lamer, at-large council member, motioned to remove an ordinance to install a stop sign at the corner of South Sixth Street and West Merle Hibbs Boulevard from the table so the council could vote on it.

The council tabled the ordinance upon completion of a speed study at the intersection.

Lynn Couch, Public Works director, said the speed study shows the need for council to either lower the speed limit or install a stop sign. Doing one would make the other unnecessary.

The council voted unanimously to reject putting a stop sign in, but was unable to set the speed limit due to the absence of such a resolution on the agenda. The council will see a resolution setting the speed limit at 35 mph at its next council meeting.

Lamer said many concerned citizens have expressed a desire to have the speed limit lowered because many people walk between the two ponds in the area.

Marla Grabenbauer, third-ward council member, said as development progresses the council may look at adding a stop sign, but for now lowering the speed limit seems like the most plausible solution.

The council also heard from the public on changing the city ordinance to declassify pigs only as farm animals, which Randy Wetmore, city administrator, said will be a topic at the Jan. 21 Committee of the Whole meeting.

 
 

 

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