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North Tama student projects displayed on NASA website

January 27, 2013
By ANDREW POTTER - Staff Writer (apotter@timesrepublican.com) , Times-Republican

TRAER - When NASA recognizes your work about space, it must be something good. A group of North Tama students found that out during an assembly Thursday.

A total of 13 students were honored at an assembly for having their International Space Station Challenge projects posted on the NASA website.

"It's very cool to see North Tama students with projects on the NASA website," said North Tama science teacher Lisa Chizek.

Article Photos

T-R PHOTO BY ANDREW POTTER
North Tama school students from left, Garett Fuller, Carissa Calderwood and Parker Hulme receive certificates from science teacher Lisa Chizek Thursday during a special assembly at the school. The students were among a group that had their science projects posted on the NASA website.

The project was completed by the students last school year, but the honor recently surfaced.

Those honored were current seventh graders Andrea Ubben, Carlie Johanningmeier, Lydia Ketter and Clowey Stammer and sixth graders Kendra TeBeest, Madeline Butts, Caleb DeBoef, Garett Fuller, Parker Hulme, Carissa Calderwood, Cael Even, Zach Ambrose, Chase Morrison, Kameron Bergen and former North Tama student Alex Alvarez.

Their mission was to come up with a project from science experiment fact sheets about the space station on the NASA site. They indicated in their projects what the experiment was about and what they learned. One the hurdles for the students was wading through all the scientific language in their research.

"It was very challenging for the kids to figure out," Chizek said.

It appears the students were up for the challenge.

"Figuring out what the experiment was about was challenging, but that made it fun," Cael Even said. "I like learning about the ISS and how there is no upside down in space."

The projects were evaluated by NASA scientists, and the highest scoring works were posted on the NASA website. Chizek helped create the ISS Challenge during an internship at the Johnson Space Center in Houston.

"It is a wonderful learning experience for students because it is creative, collaborative, challenging, and open-ended," Chizek said.

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Contact Andrew Potter at 641-753-6611 or apotter@timesrepublican.com

 
 

 

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