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Van Cliburn, pianist and Cold War hero, dies at 78

February 28, 2013
By ANGELA K. BROWN , THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT WORTH, Texas - For a time in Cold War America, Van Cliburn had all the trappings of a rock star: sold-out concerts, adoring, out-of-control fans and a name recognized worldwide. He even got a ticker-tape parade in New York City.

And he did it all with only a piano and some Tchaikovsky concertos.

The celebrated pianist played for every American president since Harry Truman, plus royalty and heads of state around the world. But he is best remembered for winning a 1958 piano competition in Moscow that helped thaw the icy rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union.

Article Photos

AP PHOTO
This March 2, 2011 file photo shows President Barack Obama presenting a 2010 National Medal of Arts to pianist Van Cliburn during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Cliburn died early Wednesday, at his Fort Worth home following a battle with bone cancer. He was 78.

Cliburn, who died Wednesday at 78 after fighting bone cancer, was "a great humanitarian and a brilliant musician whose light will continue to shine through his extraordinary legacy," said his publicist and longtime friend Mary Lou Falcone. "He will be missed by all who knew and admired him, and by countless people he never met."

The young man from the small east Texas town of Kilgore was a baby-faced 23-year-old when he won the first International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow just six months after the Soviets' launch of Sputnik embarrassed the U.S. and inaugurated the space race.

Cliburn returned to a hero's welcome and the ticker-tape parade - the first ever for a classical musician. A Time magazine cover proclaimed him "The Texan Who Conquered Russia."

 
 

 

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