Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Contact Us | Home RSS
 
 
 

China’s Shuanghui in $4.7B deal for Smithfield

May 30, 2013
By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM , THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RICHMOND, Va. - That ham sandwich you had for lunch is the latest example of China's growing appetite for U.S. investment.

Smithfield Foods Inc., one of the biggest pork producers in the U.S., on Wednesday agreed to be bought by Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd., the majority shareholder in China's largest meat processor, for about $4.72 billion.

The deal, which still faces a federal regulatory review and Smithfield shareholder approval, is the largest takeover of a U.S. company by a Chinese firm. It's the latest in a string of such deals made recently by Chinese companies.

Article Photos

AP PHOTO
In this Sept. 6, 2011 file photo, shows a Smithfield ham at a grocery store in Richardson, Texas. Chinese meat processor Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd. agreed Wednesday, to buy Smithfield Foods Inc. for approximately $4.72 billion in a deal that will take the world's biggest pork producer private.

But the acquisition is likely to face hefty U.S. scrutiny. It comes at a time when China has had serious food safety concerns, some of which have included Smithfield's suitor, Shuanghui.

Risks to the U.S. food supply "enters everybody's mind," said Paul Mariani, director at Variant Capital Advisors in Chicago, who previously worked at a food and agribusiness boutique investment bank. But he said he believes Smithfield will continue to operate as normal.

Smithfield said the deal isn't about importing Chinese pork into the U.S. Instead, the company says it's a chance to export into new markets with its brands, such as Smithfield, Armour and Farmland.

Smithfield CEO Larry Pope said in a conference call on Wednesday that the transaction "preserves the same old Smithfield, only with more opportunities and new markets and new frontiers."

"People have this belief ... that everything in America is made in China," he said. "Open your refrigerator door, look inside. Nothing in there is made in China because American agriculture is the most competitive and efficient in the world."

Indeed, the acquisition highlights what could be growing interest in American food by Chinese consumers. Foreign food, such as milk powder from New Zealand and vegetables from neighboring Asian countries, is prized by Chinese consumers because of the frequent domestic food safety scandals in their country.

Among the most notorious, six babies died and 300,000 were sickened in 2008 from drinking infant formula and other dairy tainted with the industrial chemical melamine. And Shuanghui's reputation was battered in 2011 when state broadcaster CCTV revealed its pork contained clenbuterol - a banned chemical that makes pork leaner but can be harmful to humans.

Derek Scissors, an expert on China's economy the Heritage Foundation, a Washington-based conservative think tank, said companies like Shuanghui are "not looking to cause any trouble in the American market at all" or "cut corners."

"Quite the opposite ... They want to gain from what the U.S. is able to do," he said. "But whether they can operate an American company in the U.S. market remains to be determined."

The deal comes as Smithfield has been under pressure to improve its business.

 
 

 

I am looking for: