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Ill. passes nation’s toughest fracking regulations

June 2, 2013
By KERRY LESTER , THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Illinois came a giant step closer to approving the nation's strictest regulations for high-volume oil and gas drilling on Friday, as lawmakers approved a measure they hoped would create thousands of jobs in economically depressed areas of southern Illinois.

The Senate passed the legislation 52-3, one day after it was overwhelmingly approved in the other chamber. Gov. Pat Quinn promised to sign it, calling the legislation a "shot in the arm for many communities."

The legislation was crafted with the help of industry and some environmental groups - an unusual collaboration that has been touted as a potential model for other states.

Article Photos

AP PHOTO
A protester against fracking attends a rally after a House Committee hearing on oil drilling, 'fracking' legislation at the Illinois State Capitol, May 21, in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois House considers a pioneering bill to regulate high-volume oil and gas drilling in hopes of kick-starting an industry that proponents say could bring thousands of jobs.

Legislation sponsor Mike Frerichs, a Champaign Democrat, said stakeholders "sat down for hundreds and thousands of hours" to hammer out the issue.

"These are tough regulations that are going to protect and preserve our most valuable resources in our state," he told floor members. "We are going to increase home produced energy in our state in one of the most environmentally friendly ways possible."

While proponents have said hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," would generate tens of thousands of jobs, opponents have been pushing for a two-year moratorium to allow more time to examine health and environmental impact. They are worried fracking could cause pollution and deplete water resources.

"This bill was written by industry and parties that have a vested interest," said Annette McMichael, a property owner in Johnson County who belongs to a coalition that opposes fracking. "We have no say in our own water. ... We are totally helpless."

Despite the numerous protests by her group, Southern Illinoisans Against Fracturing Our Environment, and others - one woman was forcibly removed from the House chamber on Thursday after the vote - there was little opposition to the measure on the floor. Senators on both sides of the aisle praised the compromise.

"This could be a bright economic future for many, many Illinoisans," said Sen. Kirk Dillard, a Hinsdale Republican.

Fracking uses high-pressure mixtures of water, sand or gravel and chemicals are used to crack rock formations deep underground and release oil and natural gas.

Among the provisions in the proposed legislation are requirements that drillers disclose the chemicals they use and that they test water before and after fracking. Companies also would be liable for any water pollution.

 
 

 

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