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Anti-shutdown bill advances; big fight still looms

September 26, 2013
By DAVID ESPO , The Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Unanimous but far from united, the Senate advanced legislation to prevent a partial government shutdown on Wednesday, the 100-0 vote certain to mark merely a brief pause in a fierce partisan struggle over the future of President Barack Obama's signature health care law.

The vote came shortly after Texas Sen. Ted Cruz held the Senate in session overnight - and the Twitterverse in his thrall - with a near-22-hour speech that charmed the tea party wing of the GOP, irritated the leadership and was meant to propel fellow Republican lawmakers into an all-out struggle to extinguish the law.

Defying one's own party leaders is survivable, he declared in pre-dawn remarks on the Senate floor. "Ultimately, it is liberating."

Article Photos

AP PHOTO
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas talks to reporters as he emerges from the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, after his overnight crusade railing against the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as 'Obamacare.' Cruz ended the marathon Senate speech opposing President Barack Obama's health care law after talking for 21 hours, 19 minutes.

Legislation passed by the Republican-controlled House last week would cancel all funds for the three-year-old law, preventing its full implementation. But Senate Democrats have enough votes to restore the funds, and Majority Leader Harry Reid labeled Cruz's turn in the spotlight "a big waste of time."

Any differences between the two houses' legislation must be reconciled and the bill signed into law by next Tuesday to avert a partial shutdown.

The issue is coming to the forefront in Congress as the Obama administration works to assure a smooth launch for the health care overhaul's final major piece, a season of enrollment beginning Oct. 1 for millions who will seek coverage on so-called insurance exchanges.

Health and Human Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told reporters this week that consumers will have an average of 53 plans to choose from, and her department estimated the average individual premium for a benchmark policy known as the "second-lowest cost silver plan" would range from a low of $192 in Minnesota to a high of $516 in Wyoming. Tax credits will bring down the cost for many.

Republicans counter that the legislation is causing employers to defer hiring new workers, lay off existing ones and reduce the hours of still others to hold down costs as they try to ease the impact of the bill's taxes and other requirements.

Eight months in office, he drew handshakes from several conservative lawmakers as he finished speaking and accolades from tea party and other groups.

In addition to the praise, Cruz he drew a withering rebuttal from one fellow Republican, Arizona Sen. John McCain.

McCain read aloud Cruz's comments from Tuesday comparing those who doubt the possibility of eradicating the health care law to former British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlin and others who had suggested Adolf Hitler and the Nazis could not be stopped in the 1940s.

"I resoundingly reject that allegation," said McCain, whose grandfather led U.S. carrier forces in the Pacific during World War II, and whose father commanded two submarines.

 
 

 

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