Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Contact Us | Home RSS
 
 
 

Film ‘12 Years a Slave’ has ties to DC-area site

November 5, 2013
By BRETT ZONGKER , The Associated Press

ALEXANDRIA, Va. - The painful story of a free black man lured from his home in New York in 1841 to be sold into slavery, now the basis of the new film "12 Years a Slave," has a little-known connection to a slave site that still stands near the nation's capital.

Alexandria's one-time slave pen complex, based out of a colonial-style rowhouse, was once the epicenter of the domestic human trade in the United States after the importation of slaves was banned, according to historians. The last slave trader at the site, James H. Birch, was the same dealer who paid kidnappers $250 for Solomon Northup of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and sold him into slavery in Louisiana.

Northup's story of 12 years in slavery, published in 1853, is the basis of the new film from British director Steve McQueen. Now curators hope the film will spark new interest from visitors and historians in a rare slave site that still stands near the Capitol. It has been open to visitors for five years as the Freedom House Museum, now a place to learn about American history.

"What's very unique about this building is it's one of the few remaining buildings that the slave trade actually took place in," said curator Julian Kiganda, who designed the exhibits. "Everyone who's come through there, they feel moved."

Northup's story is among several narratives illustrating the slave trade at the time. Exhibits in the brick basement that once served as slave quarters include artifacts found there, along with the original bars and door of this slave jail.

While there's no evidence Northup was sold through this particular site, Kiganda said it's similar in design to other slave jails at the time.

 
 

 

I am looking for: